Volume 3, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 44-55
On the Politics of Lockdown and Lockdown Politics in Africa: COVID-19 and Partisan Expedition in Ghana
Awaisu Imurana Braimah, Department of Political Science Education, University of Education, Winneba, Ghana
Received: Jun. 2, 2020;       Accepted: Jun. 24, 2020;       Published: Jul. 6, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.jpsir.20200303.11      View  52      Downloads  48
Abstract
This article examined the lockdown jigsaw that characterised Ghana’s surveillance and management of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the main opposition political party – National Democratic Congress (NDC) – and the Ghana Medical Association (GMA) in particular advocated a total shutdown of the country in a bid to contain the spread of the virus, the government in March, 2020, announced a partial lockdown of specific cities and suburbs where the virus was endemic for a period of 21 days. In the process, the government embarked on an aggressive contact tracing and test that catapulted the number of confirmed cases in March, 2020, from 2 to 7,303 as at May 27, 2020. The government subsequently, lifted the partial lockdown to ease the suffering of the vulnerable masses in society while strictly observing social or physical distancing and other protocols advocated by the World Health Organisation (W. H. O.) and the Ghana Health Service (G. H. S). The lifting of the restrictions by the President of the Republic, attracted varied reactions from the populace and some interest groups. While the vulnerable and the ‘have-nots’ in society whose survival is contingent on daily economic hustle and bustle in the city hailed the lifting of restrictions, the elites and economic self-dependent individuals on the other hand, criticised the government for lifting the partial lockdown. This paper argues that the partial lockdown and the subsequent lifting of the restriction on movements, was premised on the machinations of politics, economics and science.
Keywords
Coronavirus, Lockdown Politics, Pathogenic Disease, Partisan Expedition, Vulnerable
To cite this article
Awaisu Imurana Braimah, On the Politics of Lockdown and Lockdown Politics in Africa: COVID-19 and Partisan Expedition in Ghana, Journal of Political Science and International Relations. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2020, pp. 44-55. doi: 10.11648/j.jpsir.20200303.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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