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Understanding Various Traditions of the Realism in International Relations

Received: 30 August 2022    Accepted: 19 September 2022    Published: 11 October 2022
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Abstract

Realism is considered a very crucial theoretical approach which claims to represent the reality of international relations and it rejects the imaginative idealism. It created a place between war and peace; quarrels and moral standards; and national interests and national cooperation, it ultimately provides authenticity to the prior as compared to the latter respectively. Realist approach in International Relations emphasizes the constraints on politics imposed by human nature and the absence of the world government and together they make international relations largely an arena of power and interest. It also gives validity to selfish human nature, anarchic structure of the world, self-preservation, self-help, strategic military action, diplomatic conversations, balance of power/threat, cultural conflicts and after all violence. However, scholars who are working in this series have much to contribute to normative debates regarding international politics. But it is the need of hour to recognize the significant differences among realists. They offer conflicting results to many methodological political and ethical questions. It seems that realism is a flourishing research agenda in both international relations and political theory. This research article will theoretically and analytically examine the realism as an approach to international relations that has emerged gradually through the work-series of analysts in different continents in many ways of establishments that found logical as various traditions. In a conclusive way, it seems that realism is an inexhaustible and much timeless theory.

Published in Journal of Political Science and International Relations (Volume 5, Issue 4)
DOI 10.11648/j.jpsir.20220504.11
Page(s) 96-103
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Anarchy, Balance of Power, Human Nature, Military Action, Self-Help

References
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Cite This Article
  • APA Style

    Ajay Kumar. (2022). Understanding Various Traditions of the Realism in International Relations. Journal of Political Science and International Relations, 5(4), 96-103. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jpsir.20220504.11

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    ACS Style

    Ajay Kumar. Understanding Various Traditions of the Realism in International Relations. J. Polit. Sci. Int. Relat. 2022, 5(4), 96-103. doi: 10.11648/j.jpsir.20220504.11

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    AMA Style

    Ajay Kumar. Understanding Various Traditions of the Realism in International Relations. J Polit Sci Int Relat. 2022;5(4):96-103. doi: 10.11648/j.jpsir.20220504.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.jpsir.20220504.11,
      author = {Ajay Kumar},
      title = {Understanding Various Traditions of the Realism in International Relations},
      journal = {Journal of Political Science and International Relations},
      volume = {5},
      number = {4},
      pages = {96-103},
      doi = {10.11648/j.jpsir.20220504.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jpsir.20220504.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.jpsir.20220504.11},
      abstract = {Realism is considered a very crucial theoretical approach which claims to represent the reality of international relations and it rejects the imaginative idealism. It created a place between war and peace; quarrels and moral standards; and national interests and national cooperation, it ultimately provides authenticity to the prior as compared to the latter respectively. Realist approach in International Relations emphasizes the constraints on politics imposed by human nature and the absence of the world government and together they make international relations largely an arena of power and interest. It also gives validity to selfish human nature, anarchic structure of the world, self-preservation, self-help, strategic military action, diplomatic conversations, balance of power/threat, cultural conflicts and after all violence. However, scholars who are working in this series have much to contribute to normative debates regarding international politics. But it is the need of hour to recognize the significant differences among realists. They offer conflicting results to many methodological political and ethical questions. It seems that realism is a flourishing research agenda in both international relations and political theory. This research article will theoretically and analytically examine the realism as an approach to international relations that has emerged gradually through the work-series of analysts in different continents in many ways of establishments that found logical as various traditions. In a conclusive way, it seems that realism is an inexhaustible and much timeless theory.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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    AB  - Realism is considered a very crucial theoretical approach which claims to represent the reality of international relations and it rejects the imaginative idealism. It created a place between war and peace; quarrels and moral standards; and national interests and national cooperation, it ultimately provides authenticity to the prior as compared to the latter respectively. Realist approach in International Relations emphasizes the constraints on politics imposed by human nature and the absence of the world government and together they make international relations largely an arena of power and interest. It also gives validity to selfish human nature, anarchic structure of the world, self-preservation, self-help, strategic military action, diplomatic conversations, balance of power/threat, cultural conflicts and after all violence. However, scholars who are working in this series have much to contribute to normative debates regarding international politics. But it is the need of hour to recognize the significant differences among realists. They offer conflicting results to many methodological political and ethical questions. It seems that realism is a flourishing research agenda in both international relations and political theory. This research article will theoretically and analytically examine the realism as an approach to international relations that has emerged gradually through the work-series of analysts in different continents in many ways of establishments that found logical as various traditions. In a conclusive way, it seems that realism is an inexhaustible and much timeless theory.
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Author Information
  • Department of Political Science, Ramanujan College (University of Delhi), Delhi, India

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